Things I like.

tram

  1. Getting on the side of the tram that minimises what I have to walk at arrival
  2. Coming up with a good analogy
  3. Biking in the city, which is my definition of freedom
  4. Having a set of translucent flag post-its when reading a novel
  5. Arguing about MBTI
  6. Paying bills on e-banking
  7. Staying in bed on very sunny days. No noise, no light, no outside stimuli.
  8. Being truthful and sometimes nervous when I blog
  9. Rays of sunlight through half-closed window blinds, reflecting on the moving dust
  10. Making a friend, because it’s so rare.

This is inspired by Jessica Gross’ project, Things we like. I like how it made me pause and cristallise those small events into words.

Your turn, now.

Montecastelli: the cello-piano duet

So we went on stage. I remembered that I always hated being on stage alone, on the piano. I never understood the difference between practice and stage. Why one was important, and the other one not.

The whole lab was watching from below, gathered in this small chapel made of stones, in the middle of Tuscany. It was cold, but not too cold. It was odd, but not too odd.

He pulled his bow – played the levée –

And I fell in love.

I fell in love with the moment. Continue reading

Of complex networks, and why we love hook-ups.

This post is about two friends hooking up.

But before getting to that part, it’s a confession of how unstable and unbalanced I have become since I started research. Work-life balance now depends pretty much on whether Github loads correctly. The lack of results or any kind of milestones is nerve-wrecking.

I cope by doing sports. Lots and lots of sports. Enough to mess up my hormonal system.

Fun fact: did you know that professional athletes force their body so much that it is constantly in survival mode? It reacts by cutting non-essential functions, such as reproduction functions. Next time when you watch sport, think of these professional athletes as all temporarily sterile. Continue reading

How to find an interesting position, anywhere

start_maze

In the lab I got assigned a project that no one wanted.

The data is messy, there is no clear goal and I literally heard sighs of relief from those who passed it on to me.

Truth is, this is very common when you start any job, in industry or research. The new colleague gets the projects that others left out. It, however, doesn’t have to stay that way. Here’s how you can get projects you’re interested in, in any working environment. Continue reading